Is the Childhood Vaccine Schedule Safe?

By Barbara Loe Fisher

Is the childhood vaccine schedule safe? 1

In 1953, health officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control told doctors to give children 16 doses of four vaccines by age six. 2

In 1983, it was 23 doses of 7 vaccines by age six. 3

In 2013, it was 69 doses of 16 vaccines by age 18, with 50 doses given by age six. 4

With infants and children in America getting four times as many vaccinations as their grandparents got, how healthy are they?

Today, 1 child in 6 is learning disabled. 5 In 1976, it was 1 child in 30. 6

Today, 1 child in 9 has asthma. 7 In 1980, it was 1 child in 27.8 9

Today, 1 child in 50 develops autism. 10 In the 1990s, it was 1 child in 555. 11 12

Today, 1 child in 400 has diabetes. 13 In 2001, it was 1 child in 500 has diabetes. 14

On top of that, millions of children suffer with seizures, inflammatory bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, life-threatening allergies, anxiety, depression and behavior disorders. 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

In 2013, a physician committee at the Institute of Medicine reported that there were fewer than 40 studies examining the safety of the government’s vaccine schedule for children under age six. 25

Only 40 studies.

Vaccine safety science has so many knowledge gaps 26 27 28 that the Institute of Medicine could not determine whether the timing and numbers of vaccinations given to babies and young children is or is not responsible for the development of learning disabilities – asthma – autoimmunity – autism – developmental and behavior disorders – seizures – and other kinds of brain and immune system problems. 29

An unprecedented number of children are born healthy, get vaccinated and are never healthy again. It is a public health crisis that cannot be ignored.

Before you take a risk, find out what it is.

CONTINUES HERE:  http://www.nvic.org/NVIC-Vaccine-News/October-2017/is-the-childhood-vaccine-schedule-safe.aspx

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If You Vaccinate, Ask 8!

By Barbara Loe Fisher

Vaccines are pharmaceutical products that come with risks that can be greater for some people. 1 2 No vaccine is safe for everyone. 3 4

If you choose to vaccinate, ask 8 questions before you do: 5

  1. Number One: Am I sick right now? Getting vaccinated while sick could increase risks for a vaccine reaction or lower vaccine effectiveness. 6
  2. Number Two: Have I had a bad reaction to a vaccination before? Getting re-vaccinated after a previous vaccine reaction could cause a more serious reaction, injury or death. 7 8
  3. Number Three: Do I have a personal or family history of vaccine reactions, neurological disorders, severe allergies or immune system problems? Always review your personal and family medical history when evaluating vaccine benefits and risks. 9 10 11 12
  4. Number Four: Do I know the disease and vaccine risks? Learn about disease and vaccine risks that could be greater for you or your child. 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  5. Number Five: Do I have full information about the vaccine’s side effects? Before you take a risk, find out what it is for each vaccine you or your child will receive. 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
  6. Number Six: Do I know how to identify and report a vaccine reaction? Learn how to recognize vaccine reaction symptoms and where and how to report them. 28 29 30
  7. Number Seven: Do I know I need to keep a written record, including the vaccine manufacturer’s name and lot number, for vaccinations? The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986 requires all vaccine providers to record information about vaccines given to you or your child. 31
  8. Number Eight: Do I know I have the right to make an informed choice? Informed consent to medical risk taking, including vaccine risk taking, is a human right. 32 33  34  35

Explore NVIC’s Ask 8 Information Kiosk for referenced information and a variety of materials designed to educate you about vaccines, diseases and how to make educated vaccine decisions. You can download posters and brochures to share with others or send an ecard to family and friends. You can also post or read personal vaccination experiences on this website. Click here to learn more and start your journey!

It’s your family. Your health. Your choice.

Back to School, Navigating Vaccine Choices and Holding State Agencies Accountable

SEE ALSO:

Florida State Vaccine Requirements
http://www.nvic.org/Vaccine-Laws/state-vaccine-requirements/florida.aspx

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Back to School, Navigating Vaccine Choices and Holding State Agencies Accountable

Original here:  http://www.nvic.org/NVIC-Vaccine-News/August-2017/back-to-school-navigating-vaccine-choices.aspx

By Theresa Wrangham, NVIC Executive Director

It’s that time of year when parents receive school enrollment packages that include reminders of state school vaccine requirements. Many parents do not realize that most states offer exemptions for medical, religious or philosophical reasons. NVIC’s state vaccine law web pages are among our most highly visited web pages and our staff and volunteers work hard to keep them up-to-date with the most current vaccine and exemption information so that you understand your options.

For reliable facts helpful in evaluating vaccine and disease risks, our web pages on diseases and vaccines are an excellent resource for you as a parent, and for your college-bound young adult.

Click the image above to view full sized interactive map and state exemption information.

Updated School Vaccine Requirements and Exemption Information on NVIC.org

NVIC’s state web pages contain links to your state’s school, daycare and higher education vaccine requirements and information on how to obtain an exemption. Many parents use these pages to educate themselves on what is required and how to obtain a vaccine exemption for their children entering into public school.

The web pages also include vaccine related statutes, with links to the actual law, for each state that allow you to see which vaccines are legally required to help you decide whether to accept, delay or decline one or more vaccines.

Many parents question the need for, and safety of, vaccines,1 and sharing NVIC’s well-referenced information with others encourages educated vaccine decision-making. Information on NVIC’s website will also help you understand the differences between state mandated school vaccine requirements and the federally recommended vaccine schedule.

Navigating College Vaccination Requirements

College bound students face pressure to receive vaccines for meningitis, HPV, and influenza, among others.2345Because most parents are no longer legally responsible for making medical decisions for their college age children, vaccination is often the first medical risk-taking decision these young people will make.

college choices

College vaccination and exemption requirements usually comply with the state’s vaccination and exemption laws for K-12, however, in some states these policies are left to the individual colleges to create. In addition, if a college student is going into a health or veterinary profession that requires clinical practice during their course of study, vaccinations are often required in order to complete coursework.

Don’t wait until enrolling into a college or university and/or health care related program to ask what vaccines are required for entry. Obtaining higher-ed vaccine requirements and exemption options in advance of deciding which college to attend can prevent post enrollment surprises. Parents can help their sons and daughters find accurate information and resources regarding vaccines and their risks, diseases and the frequency and severity of complications, and their child’s right to make voluntary, informed decisions about vaccines. NVIC.org is such a resource.

When considering different colleges, you can proactively ask the admissions officer for the school’s vaccination policy in writing (should be on the institution’s letterhead) and research the state’s exemption laws on NVIC’s state pages. Many prospective college students visit a number of college campuses over the course of several months, so it is a good idea to get a reconfirmation of the vaccine policy in writing prior to making final college decisions to prevent any last-minute problems.

Prevent State Agencies from Abusing their Authority

As you and your college student make vaccine decisions, it is important to not only understand your state’s vaccination laws but to also support the protection and expansion of the human right to make voluntary choices about vaccination.

NVIC has noted recent trends by state health departments to overstep and abuse their legal authority by making vaccine exemptions more difficult to obtain. This overreach of authority is often initiated by health departments through a rule-making process.

We hope you will get involved in protecting vaccine choices by becoming a registered user of the NVIC Advocacy Portal to support NVIC’s efforts to prevent abuse of government authority. You can make public comments during these rule-making proceedings, and send copies of your comment to your legislators as a way of informing them about how these regulatory changes affect you and your family. It is a way of building a relationship with your legislator and holding your state agencies accountable.

CONTINUES HERE: http://www.nvic.org/NVIC-Vaccine-News/August-2017/back-to-school-navigating-vaccine-choices.aspx

Intelligent People Who are Stupid About Vaccines?

Original here: http://www.thevaccinereaction.org/2017/07/intelligent-people-who-are-stupid-about-vaccines/

by Marco Cáceres

“The more highly skilled and educated populations are clearly questioning vaccinations.” That statement was recently made by Lorraine Baker, MD, president of AMA Victoria—a medical trade association representing doctors in Australia’s southeastern state of Victoria.1  It is not an unusual statement to make when referring to people who veer from mainstream vaccine science orthodoxy—either a little bit or a lot.

Oddly, it is many of those within the mainstream medical and public health communities who adamantly believe they are right on the issue of vaccine science who tend to shy away from looking beyond mandatory vaccination policy and openly debating the continually evolving science.

In a study published last year in the journal EBioMedicine seeking to gauge the level of confidence in the necessity, safety and effectiveness of vaccines in 67 countries, investigators found that people holding Masters or PhD degrees were “not associated with more positive views on vaccine importance and effectiveness.” People with “no education” had more positive views about vaccination.2  

The fact that people, who are educated, trained in critical thinking, and financially solvent, are choosing to do their own research and make independent decisions about vaccination is commonly recognized in the evolving debate on the safety and effectiveness of vaccines and the ethics of mandatory vaccination policies. You can see this theme in numerous media articles with headlines that read:

  • “Anti-Vaccination Parents Richer, Better Educated”3  
  • “Immunizations: More Education May Not Mean More Vaccination”4  
  • “More Educated Parents Less Likely To Vaccinate and Feed Children Sugar and GMO Foods”5  
  • “New Study Says Vaccine Deniers Are Richer, Whiter, and More Educated”6  
  • “Rich, educated and stupid parents are driving the vaccination crisis”7  
  • “Why Do Affluent, Well-Educated People Refuse Vaccines?”8  
  • “Why Some Rich, Educated Parents Avoid Vaccines”9  

Of course, this recognition by mandatory vaccination apologists of the high education level and earning power of vaccine dissenters is, curiously, often delivered  as an insult. Beneath the insult lies a subliminal question: “If you are so smart, then how can you be so stupid and disagree with us about vaccination?” It’s a great question.

However, it assumes that the science supporting  the belief that vaccines are safe and effective is rock solid—that those who disagree with the majority view about vaccination are wrong. It assumes that vaccine science “is settled” and cannot or should not be revisited or revised. Both assumptions are entirely up for debate.

Oddly, it is many of those within the mainstream medical and public health communities who adamantly believe they are right on the issue of vaccine science who tend to shy away from looking beyond mandatory vaccination policy and openly debating the continually evolving science. Their preference is to simply shut the door on any contrarian talk by anyone who challenges any piece of the mainstream vaccine paradigm. One must either accept the paradigm in its entirety or risk being labeled a heretic and a danger to the public health, deserving of being punished and banished from civilized society.

CONTINUES HERE: http://www.thevaccinereaction.org/2017/07/intelligent-people-who-are-stupid-about-vaccines/